July–the midpoint of the summer- offers us the opportunity to reflect, celebrate and remember those who serve our country thanks to Independence Day.  There is pride, love, joy and even stress! In front of homes our flag proudly flies, parents are pulling out their hair counting down the days until they can ship their kids off to school while teachers are hoping to make the summer last just one.more.day.  Summer months also mean picnics and parades, but for many Sigma Kappa alumnae and collegian’s July marks the time of the “Violet Bubble” aka Convention!

“Firing” up the Summer Sky

Magical–that is what I think of during a 4th of July Fireworks show. I have to admit that is always my favorite part of the day after celebrating at a parade and community picnic. I am constantly amazed by the colors, designs, and shows put on my little town. For 30 minutes we sit in awe “ohhing” and “ahhing” as red, white, blue, purple and more light up the night sky.  My sons were enthralled with the show asking questions about how they get the colors, where they are being shot off from and why we celebrate this day.  I look at my boys and share with them the little I know about the chemistry of fireworks but also include a small history lesson. They learn, briefly, about our military hero’s who have fought for our right to be our own nation years ago. We also talk about my brother in law (Uncle Mike) who is active duty army and the many family and friends we have serving the military. Looking around during the parade and fireworks I see how this event brings together neighbors and communities to celebrate year after year the founding of our nation and thanking our soldiers near and far.

Independently Violet

In a similar manner we as Sigma Kappa’s are brought together by our founders who created an organization based on values, goals and meaning. While this is vastly different from the fight of our military, our founders had a mission to carry out to benefit the women of Colby College and 200 years later have impacted the world in so many ways including our military.

While this may seem simple, I thought about this while attending convention in Houston last week. Each year on November 9th we honor our founders with celebrations at alumnae and collegiate chapters. Like parents at the parades, we share the stories with our newest initiates hoping to pass on the legacies of sisters so they too may understand our ritual and values. In July we gather together to celebrate as a sorority community. This year, fitting, we honored a military sister with our highest award –Colby Award. Hearing the story of Brigadier General Linda S. Marchione, Tau, made me proud to be a Sigma Kappa. She shared with convention attendees how Sigma Kappa made her feel welcome, gave her a place to call home and accepted an ROTC woman.

So for a week we reveled in violet bliss, lived encased in the safety of the violet bubble but also had the opportunity to reflect on how our sisters are making a difference in the world. From collegiates impacting their campuses to alumnae serving our nation with pride Independence Day is more than fireworks and parades. It is also a day to think of our sisters who are serving our nation and say thank you for representing your nation and our beloved sorority.

Do you know a sister who is or has served in the armed forces? What are some ways alumnae and collegiate chapters can reach out to both sisters and any military unit serving our nation? My alumnae chapter supports a local knitting group that sends blankets and hats to soldiers in Afghanistan. One local collegiate chapter sent care packages to soldiers.

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One Response to Fireworks in the Violet Bubble

  1. Courtney Hannah Courtney Hannah says:

    I live near a base, I will try to locate a sister who is serving. Our alumnae chapter supporting her would be so great and meaningful.

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